“The Flight Attendant” by Chris Bohjalian

Genre:        General Fiction (Adult)The Flight Addendant

Publisher:  Doubleday

Pub. Date:  March 13, 2018

Possible Spoiler Alert

The author, Chris Bohjalian, is one of my all-time favorite authors. I believe he is today’s Hemingway, writing American literature with an emotional force. I first discovered Bohjalian when I read his 2010 book, “Midwives.” The setting for that book is rural Vermont, known as the Northeast Kingdom (NEK). Since I spend a good deal of my year in the NEK I was delighted when I recognized the towns and the region’s customs that the author is referring to, especially when he mentions the town of Barton, which is where I summer. But even if the work was located in an unfamiliar place, I still would have loved the novel. “Midwives” blends moral, medical and political themes. “The Flight Attendant” is similar if you substitute the word “medical” with “sexual.”

Although, many of the author’s novels (and I have read them all) take place in Vermont, this one doesn’t. The sexy, flirtatious flight attendant, Cassie, lives in NYC, and her work has her traveling internationally. The protagonist is an alcoholic who is self-destructive. She is no stranger to blackouts and is accustomed to waking up in the bed of a man that she just met on the plane. But this time, when she wakes up in a Dubai hotel room, the man lying next to her is dead, she has blood in her hair, and she has no memory of what happened. Did she, or didn’t she kill him? The novel could be entitled “Confessions of a Flight Attendant,” as its filled with sex, murder, and mystery, but have no fear that you are reading a rubbish; Bohjalian is too talented to write a trashy novel. And if a murder mystery is not your type of story, Bohjalian also manages to get today’s headlines into the plot, including Russian espionage, the FBI, and the CIA. His ability to weave these topics together is enjoyable. Moreover, as in all his novels, it is obvious that a good deal of research went into the writing, giving the story an authentic feel.

Unfortunately, for me, this page-turner lost most of its oomph somewhere along the way. Maybe it is because Cassie, who is now known in the news as the “Tart Cart Killer” is so self-destructive you can guess how she will sabotage any progress her lawyer makes on her case. Or maybe the surprise ending is too much of a leap for me to believe. Or maybe, and most probably, I expect the author to write a masterpiece time and time again. Although this is not my favorite of his work, I still recommend you read this book. Bohjalian is not capable of writing an uninteresting novel. He also happens to be a writer who respects his readers and reviewers. He actually, contacts myself and other reviewers via the internet thanking us for reading and reviewing his work. He has been writing best sellers for over twenty years, there is no professional reason for him to do this other than that he is a nice guy who happens to be one heck of a story-teller. Enjoy the book, you will never board a plane again without wondering what your flight attendant is really like.

I received this novel from the publisher at no cost in exchange for an honest review.

Find all my reviews at:  https://www.goodreads.com/review/list/4793025-martie-nees-record?shelf=read  & https://twitter.com/neesrecord

 

 

 

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THROWBACK THURSDAY PICK OF THE WEEK

Some of my favorite reviewers are on this list.

IT'S BOOK TALK

throwbackthursday

I began this Throwback Thursday meme as a way to share some of my old favorites as well as sharing books that I’m FINALLY getting around to reading that were published months or years ago. You know, the ones waiting patiently on my TBR list while I continue to pile more titles on top of them:)! I like that these older books are usually much easier than new releases to get a hold of at libraries and elsewhere.

If you have your own Throwback Thursdayrecommendation feel free to jump on board, you’re welcome to use my pic as well. If you’d like to link back to me that’d be great as I really try my best to include everyone who’s participating week by week at the bottom of my post so all my readers can enjoy all the awesome Throwback picks!

My Pick This week is….

31450958Published May 23, 2017…

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“The Exact Nature of Our Wrongs” by Janet Peery

Genre:         Adult Fiction                    The Exact Nature of our Wrongs

Pub. Date:   September 19, 2017

Publisher:    St. Martin’s Press

Tolstoy’s begins “Anna Karenina” with his now famous first line of “Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.” That opening is a fitting way to begin this review by author, Janet Peery, a National Book Award finalist in 1996.   In this character-driven novel, her work has shades of Jonathan Franzen’s, “The Corrections.”   “Exact Nature” is a family drama that looks into the dynamics of a family in Kansas as the parents enter their sunset years. The wife has been a homemaker and her husband is a retired judge who is now showing signs of dementia. They had six children but lost one child decades earlier after a lifetime of health issues.  The surviving five adult children are well into middle-age and learning how to cope with their aging parents.  Unfortunately, their children might be living in their middle-aged bodies, but seem trapped within their ten-year-old minds, filled with sibling rivalry. The children (still in competition for being the favorite) all have eyes on their parents’ estate that they hope to inherit, especially one special chair of their father’s.

In an obvious attempt to obtain the chair, the youngest daughter suggests hosting an 89th birthday party for the father.  She innocently suggests bringing the chair over to her home so he can sit in it during the party.  The siblings all see right through this and they are annoyed.  The reader is chuckling.  At the party, the youngest, their mother’s favorite, passes out in the birthday cake.  The youngest is a charming, sweet, gay man who is also hopelessly drug-addicted.  They realize once again they will need to drag him to rehab.  But it soon becomes clear that, although the youngest is the designated problem child, all the children have issues.  Unlike the youngest, they are functioning, but still struggle with prescription drugs, maintaining long-term relationships, foreclosure, DUIs (thank goodness the judge still has some influence), and a hidden sexual identity issue.   None are shining stars.  In other words, they are your typical dysfunctional family, and they are all unhappy in their own way.  But here is the thing: they are as caring as they are troubled.  And throughout the story, just when you think they are terrible to one another, you come to see their unbreakable bonds.  You will giggle when the daughters take their mom on a “mother-daughter” day road trip to see her childhood home.  They almost kill each other through bickering, yet the end result is heartwarming.

In beautiful prose, Perry, gives us a portrayal of real life, with characters as flawed as real people. We are given an authentic year in their lives, complete with medical, emotional, mental, physical, and financial troubles.   I found this novel to be a spot-on family portrait, with its members still loving each other for who they are.  A story about forgiveness without being preachy, it left me with lingering warmth.  This is a good book to help one remember that in today’s world we all seem obsessed with appearing perfect, when in reality none of us are or ever will be.  The youngest son spends time wondering how there can be so many troubles in a family built around a marriage that seemed trouble-less by comparison.  He is unable to find an answer.  The reader is free to make their own conclusion, for Perry does not tell us. We are left with the thought-provoking question of just what makes a family a happy or unhappy one.   It may not be as simple as Tolstoy suggested.

I received this novel from the publisher at no cost in exchange for an honest review.

Find all my reviews at https://www.goodreads.com/review/list/4793025-martie-nees-record?shelf=read

 

 

 

 

 

“Manhattan Beach” by Jennifer Egan

Genre:         General Fiction (Adult)Manatthan Beach

Pub. Date:   Oct. 3, 2017

Publisher:    Scribner

Here is the thing about this author, Jennifer Egan: she is brilliant, I might go as far as to say there is a something Shakespearean in her writing, complete with betrayal and tragedy. But like Shakespeare, for me, she can be hard to follow. I did read her 2010 Pulitzer Prize-winning book, “A Visit from the Goon Squad.” “Goon Squad” has a complicated narrative with each chapter written as a tweet, or a music chart, or a PowerPoint presentation. In other words, her writing style is unique in this work.

In “Manhattan Beach” the author writes a traditional novel. The story spans from the years of the Great Depression to WWII. We meet the Kerrigans, a Brooklyn family, and learn of their successes and failures. There is twelve-year-old Anna, her adored father, Eddie, her mother and severely disabled little sister. They are a Brooklyn Irish family that is barely scraping by in the 1930s with a strong father-daughter bond. Sounds familiar right? But this is not “A Tree Grows in Brooklyn.” There is another protagonist, the New York gangster, Dexter Styles. The father works for him. The book’s title comes from the gangster’s wealthy home on Manhattan Beach.

This is a hard review for me to write because the book is clearly well researched, which is always a plus. The feel of the novel is realistic, as are the characters. Furthermore, I love historical fiction and as a native New Yorker, I was drawn into the story with its sharp observations of NYC in this time frame. Maybe it is the plot that bothered me? There didn’t seem to be a steady tempo. I felt as though I was reading three different stories about the girl, the father and the gangster. It is when Egan flashes forward several years that I began to have trouble with the storyline.

Anna at 19 is working at the Brooklyn Naval Yard. Her father has mysteriously disappeared. She alone is the breadwinner. She elbows her way into a job as their first female diver. She also sleeps with Dexter (who initially doesn’t realize whose daughter she is). Of course, there is a disastrous outcome. The affair’s beginning seems so unlikely that it reads absurd. No matter how talented the author is, this just feels like way too much soap for my taste. I cannot talk about the father’s fate for it would be a spoiler, but that also is a bit hokey.

So what do you say about a book written by an extremely talented author, in your favorite genre, with interesting characters that keeps you hooked until it doesn’t? I am not sure. (I wish I could quote to explain, but the publisher doesn’t allow this since the book is not yet published). Maybe, I need to brush up on my own skills. Or, maybe, it would have read better as interconnected short stories. Either way, I can safely recommend that you read this book if you wish to get lost in the world of the past, the Navy, a young woman breaking into a man’s field, speakeasies, nightclubs and the end of Prohibition. As well as a lovely family saga, expect your heart to break for them. Just don’t be surprised when things start getting far-fetched.

This is an Advanced Review Copy (ARC) book.  I received this novel from the publisher at no cost in exchange for an honest review.

Find all my reviews at https://www.goodreads.com/review/list/4793025-martie-nees-record?shelf=read

“Dunbar” by Edward St. Aubyn

Genre:         Adult Literary FictionDunbar

Pub. Date:   Oct. 3, 2017

Publisher:    Crown Publishing

This is my third Hogarth Press novel.  Hogarth Press was founded in 1917 by Virginia and Leonard Woolf. In recent years Hogarth Press launched the Hogarth Shakespeare project in which much admired novelists are retelling the Bard’s stories in contemporary times.  “Dunbar” is the re-write of “King Lear” by Edward St. Aubyn.  I confess, before this novel I have never heard of Aubyn, though he is the author of eight novels and in 2006 was nominated for the Booker Prize for “Mother’s Milk.”  Other than “Vinegar Girl,” which is based on “The Taming of the Shrew,” I have not read any other of Shakespeare’s plays.  I did see the 1983 film version of “King Lear” with Laurence Olivier.  And like most, I am aware that the play is about an aging King who invites disaster when he steps down giving his power to his two corrupt daughters while rejecting his third, loving and honest daughter. In other words, they were the original dysfunctional family.

What’s the modern version of a 16th-century kingdom?  Why, a corporate empire, of course with CEO Henry Dunbar (Lear) written as a Rupert Murdoch-like multi-billionaire.  In “Dunbar,” the evil daughters/sisters are plotting a hostile takeover of the company, and have their sedated dad placed in a sanatorium while they prepare for the takeover.  In the interim, the youngest, loving daughter, who has been treated unfairly by her dad, is suspicious of her elder sisters and trying to uncover her dad’s whereabouts.  She alone is worried about her father.  We first meet Dunbar while he is in the sanitarium, where his fellow inmate, a former comedian, is plotting their escape.  The comedian can only speak when he is doing exaggerated voice imitations of others.  His mania is exhausting to read.  I personally found the similarities between the novel’s comedian and Robin Williams way too close for comfort.  I am not sure if that is the author’s intent, but that is how I read the character.  The two do escape. Now the daughters, both good and bad, are in hot pursuit of finding their father first.

Moral of the story; one cannot have the luxuries of living like a king without the responsibilities.  The parallels of the famous play and this novel are excellently drawn. The most powerful part of “Dunbar” is his emotional awakening and reconciliation with his youngest daughter.  So when tragedy hits, and she dies, I found myself feeling for her father.  That felt real.  As did the Dunbar character, even though his drugged brain read like an acid trip, which was hard to keep up with.  But the good, ever-suffering youngest daughter is so saccharine that she got on my nerves. Everyone has at least one mean bone in their body. The other two sadistic, nymphomaniac daughters, who have a taste for sexual perversion and their henchmen, are also too one-sided to be believed.  These two characters struck me as comic villains.  For some reason, I see them as an R rated “Cruella De Vil” from the Disney movie, “101 Dalmatians.”  The author has keen wit, using black humor throughout the story.  There are some good laughs for a tragedy. Still, I did not feel that “Dunbar” could stand as a novel in its own right.  If I didn’t know I was reading a re-telling of one of the Bard’s plays I would not have finished the book.  For these reasons, I am a bit disappointed in this latest Hogarth Press.  Still, the author is clearly talented and I admire his courage to take on Shakespeare.  I recommend you read this one only if you are addicted to this Shakespeare project.

This is an Advanced Review Copy (ARC) book.  I received this novel from the publisher at no cost in exchange for an honest review.

Find all my reviews at https://www.goodreads.com/review/list/4793025-martie-nees-record?shelf=read

“The Vengeance of Mothers (One Thousand White Women)” By Jim Fergus

Genre:         Historical Fiction

Vengence of Mothers

Pub. Date:   September, 12, 2017

Publisher:    St. Martin’s Press

When I read this historical novel I wasn’t aware that it is a sequel.  I did have the feeling that I was missing the first part, but I wasn’t at all confused, meaning one can read it alone.  Set in the 1800’s the book begins with the journals of two sisters, the Kelly twins,  who were part of the Wives for Indians Program that sent “undesirable” women from prisons and asylums to marry Native Americans of the Cheyenne Nation as a means to encourage assimilation.  The Kelly sisters were part of the original story, “One Thousand White Women: The Journals of May Dodd.” In “Vengeance” the reader learns that their village is destroyed by U.S. soldiers while they were waving a white flag, in a raid that leaves their children and husbands dead.   The title of the novel comes from the sisters’ desire for revenge on the US Calvary. The second journal we read in this story belongs to Molly McGill, another woman sent to marry into the Cheyenne tribe. But when Molly arrives in the West, the program is virtually defunct, and the group of Cheyenne she was sent to meet is now on the run.  Originally, this batch of women was held as hostages by the Native Americans.  When given their freedom they decided to stay. Living with the Cheyenne would be as equally dangerous and as hard a lifestyle yet still desirable than to returning to prisons or asylums.

I have learned that the first novel “The Journals of May Dodd” has been made into a movie.  I have also learned via Wikipedia that “the spark for this novel was an actual historical event that occurred in 1854. A Cheyenne chief did request the gift of 1000 white women as brides but the offer was rejected by the U.S. Army.”   This is an okay read though obviously written by a man for the author’s generalizations on women falling in love are stereotypical.  When Molly realizes she is falling for her Cheyenne captor, I felt it could have been a scene from the 1920s silent movie, “The Sheik” starring Rudolph Valentino.  However, I did enjoy learning about the Native Americans’ ways of life. Because of this novel, I intend to read more hoping it all will not be too similar to another movie named, “Dances with Wolves,” where Kevin Costner plays a disillusioned Civil War lieutenant who comes to realize that it is he and his government and not the Native Americans who are the real savages.  I say this because (although I agree with the statement), I would like to learn something new about the tribes other than that they seemed to be a more decent set of human beings than the whites who destroyed them.

This is an Advanced Review Copy (ARC) book.  I received this novel from the publisher at no cost in exchange for an honest review.

Find all my reviews at https://www.goodreads.com/review/list/4793025-martie-nees-record?shelf=read